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  • Writer's picturebidyut gogoi

Skyroot: The private firms helping India aim high in space


When questioned about Skyroot Aerospace, the Indian space-tech start-up he co-founded with a friend in 2018, Naga Bharath Daka responds as follows.


He and fellow engineer Pawan Chandana founded Skyroot, a company that manufactures rocket parts for satellite launch vehicles, after leaving their secure government jobs at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), the nation's government-run space agency, in response to the promise the space sector held for them.


By launching India's first privately constructed rocket from the ISRO's Sriharikota space center in eastern India on Friday, Skyroot made history.


Being a member of India's space sector at this time is thrilling since the country is frequently praised for completing challenging missions on a little budget.


India invests a tiny fraction of what the US and China do in space exploration.


It barely accounts for 2% of the global space market, but industry analysts are optimistic that the continuing reforms would help the industry grow.


In 2020, India made the space industry accessible to private companies, allowing them to manufacture satellites and rockets. Additionally, they are permitted to utilize ISRO's launch facilities.


Government estimates place the value of the Indian space sector at $7 billion in 2019 with a potential growth rate of $50 billion by 2024.


Following the government's approval of private businesses, Skyroot was the first startup to register with ISRO. Since then, it has welcomed around 100 start-ups.


In a series-B fundraising round that was the largest ever in the Indian space-tech industry, Skyroot secured a record $51 million (£42.9 million) in September.


A total of ten additional private companies have either debuted or are about to do so with their goods. A company by the name of Pixxel is developing a device that will assist offer photographs that can aid in mining and disaster management. A Bengaluru-based startup called Digantara is tracking space debris for the whole planet.


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